Library Link of the Day: Using Words Like ‘Really’ A Lot Could Mean You’re Really Stressed

Courtesy of Mental Floss:

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Are you feeling really exhausted? Or have you noticed that it’s incredibly hot out today?

If you recognize the adverbs above as appearing frequently in your own speech, it could be a sign that you’re stressed. At least, those are the findings in a recent study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. As Nature reports, researchers found that peppering our speech with “function words” is a pretty accurate indicator of our anxiety levels.

Function words differ from verbs and nouns in that they don’t mean much on their own and mostly serve to clarify the words around them. Included in this group are pronouns, adverbs, and adjectives. A team of American researchers suspected that people use these words more frequently when they’re stressed, so to test their hypothesis, they hooked up recording devices to 143 volunteers.

After transcribing and analyzing audio clips recorded periodically over the course of two days, the researchers compared subjects’ speech patterns to the gene expressions of certain white blood cells in their bodies that are susceptible to stress. They found that people exhibiting the biological symptoms of stress talked less overall, but when they did speak up they were more likely to use words like really and incredibly.

They also preferred the pronouns me and mine over them and their, possibly indicating their self-absorbed world view when under pressure. The appearance of these trends predicted stress in the volunteers’ genes more accurately than their own self-assessments. As study co-author Matthias Mehl told Nature, this could be a reason for doctors to “listen beyond the content” of the symptoms their patients report and pay greater attention “to the way it is expressed” in the future.

One reason function words are such a great indicator of stress is that we often insert them into our sentences unconsciously, while our choice of words like nouns and verbs is more deliberate. Anxiety isn’t the only thing that influences our speech without us realizing it. Hearing ideas we agree with also has a way of shaping our syntax.”

Stay Curious!

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